8 Subtle Color Schemes To Make Your Small Living Room Feel Bigger

by Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Making your small living room look bigger is sometimes just a matter of finding the right color schemes.  One of the most common solutions to make a room feel bigger is to paint it white from floor to ceiling. But who wants to live in a cold, uninviting white cube? To add a subtle touch of color, check out these tips. They’ll maximize your space without minimizing your style!

8 Subtle Color Schemes To Make Your Small Living Room Feel Bigger

How To Make A Small Room Feel Bigger With Color Schemes

 

Color schemes are one of the most basic elements of interior design, so the color schemes you choose can make a big impact on any space. Especially when you’re working with a small living room, the color schemes you use will make or break your design. And don’t be afraid to experiment with different shades, colors, and trends! White and neutrals aren’t the only colors around. For subtle color schemes you can incorporate into living rooms of every style, just keep scrolling!

 

1. Pale Blue Shades

Pale Blue Shades | 8 Subtle Color Schemes To Make Your Small Living Room Feel Bigger

image via HGTV

Pale, cool, blue-based colors are the colors to use to make small spaces feel bigger because the color frequencies hit our senses slower than the red-based colors. For more blue living room inspiration, check this out! Or, pair blue color schemes and brown accents with these great ideas.

 

2. Shades of Green with Lavender

Shades of Green with Lavender | 8 Subtle Color Schemes To Make Your Small Living Room Feel Bigger

image via brit + co

Green, blue, pale lavender, even dove gray are great colors if you want the feel of a bigger, wider living room. This green and lavender combo looks so chic, especially with gold accents!

 

3. Cool Yellows

Feel free to also dip your paintbrush in the cooler yellows like primrose or vanilla. All these colors reflect and bounce light, which can make your living room feel much bigger than it actually is.

 

4. Varied Wall Colours

One of the easiest ways to add depth to the room is to use color schemes with more than one shade of the same color. Painting alcoves and recesses to lead the eye further into a room will make a surprising difference. It doesn’t have to be a radically different shade—subtlety is the best way forward!

 

5. Cool Shades

Stay firmly within cool color schemes and use just a couple of shades. Too many colors can feel too busy at times. Painting the side walls of a narrow room in a paler shade than the end wall will open the space up and make it feel square-like. Check this out to see more tips for decorating long narrow living rooms.

 

6. Pale and White Accessories

Pale and even painted woods work very well in small rooms. Plenty of white and pale accessories will add to the feeling of space and airiness as well. This living room looks so refreshing, don’t you think?

 

7. Textures and Patterns

If the furniture is the same palette as the walls, then the boundaries are blurred. And big pieces like your sofa will appear less obtrusive. Texture and pattern will always keep things interesting, so go for that accent wall you’ve always wanted!

 

8. Bright Flooring and Ceilings

If pale shades aren’t your thing and you decide on a darker shade for the wall, remember that the flooring and the ceiling play a crucial role. So your flooring and ceiling should be the brightest parts of the room design. Show as much of the floor as possible to lead the eye into the furthest corners and make your space feel bigger.

 

Watch this video from Home Channel and see these color schemes come to life:

 

Whether your style is classic or contemporary, using these subtle color schemes for your small living room can make your home feel so much bigger. All you need are a few simple tricks and an eye for color trends. Happy decorating!

 

Want more color schemes for your home? Check these out! What are your favorite color schemes? Let me know in the comments section below!

Featured Image via Studio McGee

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